Careers - Ohio's Hospice (2023)

Careers - Ohio's Hospice (1)

Benefits

Where We Serve

Our Commitment

RN Positions

What Sets Us Apart

F.A.Q.'s

A Letter From Our CEO

Thank you for your interest in joining our team. We are honored to serve the wonderful mission that Ohio’s Hospice is responsible for providing. We have an incredible staff who have created a positive, supportive and team-oriented culture. They rise to and exceed every challenge, and demonstrate an inspiring commitment to our mission in providing superior care and superior services. Every day they work together as a team, focusing on improving the quality of life for our patients. Their work is the realization of our mission in action. Please ask yourself if you are prepared to meet and maintain the highest standards of care, quality, integrity and ethics. If you answer “yes” to all of these and have a positive, selfless attitude then you may be a good fit to join our mission.

We have the privilege of serving more patients than ever before, and our organization has taken many creative steps to support our staff in their work. Our staff actively participates in problem-solving to create a work environment enabling professionals to grow in their careers, excel in their profession and maintain a happy and healthy life away from work.

We want professionals who are willing to bring their passion for caring to our mission of caring. We hope you will find your calling with us, and become a valued member of our amazing team.

KENT ANDERSON
CEO, OHIO’S HOSPICE

(Video) Community Spotlight - Ohio Hospice LifeCare - Jan 2022

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“Hospice care is not about helping someone die; rather, it is about helping someone live until they die, and the journey is different for every patient. Being able to accompany a patient on their journey is truly a privilege. I am proud to be a part of a team that can provide the patients and their families such compassionate, holistic care.”

DENA WENZLER | RN SHIFT LEADER, HOSPICE HOUSE, OHIO’S HOSPICE OF DAYTON

Benefits

At Ohio’s Hospice, we are committed to offering a work environment that is second to none. We understand that part of that experience is the peace of mind in knowing the things most important to you are covered.

In order to recruit and retain passionate, energetic and committed team members, we offer generous benefits to our staff:

  • Paid vacation and time off
  • Matching 401(k)Program
  • Competitive health, dental, vision, STD/LTD and life insurance
  • Scrubs provided
  • Stipend toward purchase of our Career Wear
  • Mileage reimbursement
  • Tuition reimbursement
  • Working on Wellness health programs and initiatives offered on-site

Ohio’s Hospice is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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“I find my job at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton rewarding because of the opportunity to practice my profession in an environment where I can make a valued contribution as a team member. I have high regard for my co-workers who make a difference by carrying out their duties with skill and compassion, focusing on the families we serve. It is these qualities that inspire me and keep Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton well respected in the community.

TERESA EDINGFIELD | MUSIC THERAPIST, OHIO’S HOSPICE OF DAYTON

Careers - Ohio's Hospice (3)

Our Commitment to Expertise

Our commitment to patient focused superior care and services invites our staff to grow and elevate clinical skills. We equip our team members with the resources needed and support them with education and expertise to achieve the highest standards of care. Eighty-three percent of our eligible clinical staff members have attained hospice and palliative care certification, assuring our patients of unsurpassed clinical care.

We provide:

  • Excellence Educators to assist with initial orientation, ongoing education and professional development for every new member of the clinical staff.
  • Support and preparation, including monetary incentives, for achieving hospice and palliative care certification.
  • Educational programs tailored toward career advancement and enhancement of skills.
(Video) How Ohio’s Hospice Maintains Patient Comfort and Dignity

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Careers - Ohio's Hospice (4)

“I have a great deal of respect for the patient-centered practices at Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton. Everyone on the team has the opportunity to contribute to the patient’s care, from the personal care specialist to the care manager to the chaplains, social workers and physicians. I have never worked somewhere that there was such a team attitude. The idea that we can go that extra little distance to care for our patients isn’t considered extraordinary. It’s expected.”

CRAIG TURNER | EDUCATION COORDINATOR, OHIO’S HOSPICE

What Sets Us Apart

Ohio’s Hospice is a partnership of mission-driven, not-for-profit hospices in Ohio committed to a shared vision of strengthening and preserving community based hospices.

Our first commitment is to meet the needs of patients and their families in the communities we serve. Because our focus is on people, not profits, we offer services no other hospice will – respiratory care, occupational therapy, aromatherapy, music therapy, art therapy and massage therapy, as well as other complementary care. Our Quality of Life teams include nurses, physicians, social workers, chaplains, personal care specialists and volunteers.

Through commitment of resources and energy, we make our communities a great place to live and work. We are actively involved in local groups and organizations in collaboration with other healthcare providers to address community healthcare needs. We are leaders in end-of-life, palliative and bereavement care, providing education to the community as well as advancement opportunities for clinical professionals.

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“Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton, by far, has been the most rewarding job I have ever worked. People always ask, ‘How can you work with dying patients all day long?’ I always respond this way, ‘Death and dying is a beautiful process if it is done right.’ Doing it right means not only taking care of their physical needs but also their emotional and spiritual needs. Sometimes it is just listening to their hurts, and other times it is a simple smile or hug. When I see a patient dying peacefully with family surrounding their bedside, I know I have done my job wholeheartedly.”

CHRISTY DEMPSEY | RN ADMISSION CARE LIAISON, OHIO’S HOSPICE OF DAYTON

Careers - Ohio's Hospice (5)

Where We Serve

Ohio’s Hospice offers patients, families and caregivers compassion, peace of mind and comfort during difficult times. We are passionate about patient care and the services we are privileged to provide in our Hospice Houses, patient homes, hospitals, in-patient facilities and extended care and assisted living facilities. To serve our patients and their families, we look for individuals well-suited for each environment.

(Video) Hospice and Palliative Care Job in Ohio

PALLIATIVE CARE PROGRAMS
Through our Palliative Care programs, we address the needs of patients at the earliest point in the trajectory of serious illness. Symptom management and control provided through palliative services assure an improved quality of life. Services are available through contracted regional hospitals and at home.

HOSPICE HOUSES/HOSPITAL INPATIENT UNIT
At our Hospice Houses and hospital inpatient units, team members provide personalized short-term symptom management and medical support for patients and families. Our focus is hospitality, making our patients and families feel comfortable. Our Hospice Houses and our Inpatient Units provide superior around-the-clock medical attention to assure patient comfort. Visitors are welcome 24 hours a day, every day of the week. Once stabilized, patients can return to their home setting for continued hospice care.

HOME CARE
Many patients receive our care in the comfort of their own home. We partner with family members and the family’s physician to assure the highest quality of care through the support of our professional Quality of Life Team. We also offer education and support to caregivers so they have peace of mind while embracing life’s journey with their loved one at home. Each of our Quality of Life Team members is patient and family focused, leading with a servant’s heart.

NURSING HOME/ASSISTED-LIVING CARE
Hospice patients who reside in a nursing home or assisted living facility can receive care in their residential environment, benefiting from the combined expertise of the facility’s staff and our Hospice team — personalized to meet individual needs and guarantee peace of mind. Our clinical staff does not replace the care being provided by the facility, but our expertise in personalized care given at the end-of-life’s journey can provide patients with additional comfort.

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Careers - Ohio's Hospice (6)

“This has been by far the very best job that I’ve ever had, and I really like it here. I feel like I’m in a good spot. It’s wonderful when everyone has the same goal – to make sure that the patients have a good life and a good end of life. It’s a good place to work.”

ADELLE KESLER | RN, CHPN, RN EXCELLENCE EDUCATOR, OHIO’S HOSPICE

RN Positions

We are committed to developing the expertise of our clinical staff. Registered Nurses will participate in a comprehensive orientation program to ensure a successful transition to nursing excellence according to our quality standards.

In addition to this initial orientation, we provide ongoing educational opportunities and support through our Education Department in the form of classroom learning, online learning and hands-on guidance from Excellence Educators.

Continuous learning also occurs via collaboration with our expert staff of Hospice Certified Physicians, Advanced Practice Nurses and experienced RNs.

We require hospice and palliative care certification of all nursing staff by the end of the third year of employment. We support that goal by providing a formal training program, paying costs associated with obtaining the certification, and providing additional financial compensation upon completion.


ADMISSIONS & REFERRALS

  • This team includes the RN admissions care liaison. These nurses are responsible for the admission process, which can take anywhere from 1-3 hours depending on the complexity of the patient’s needs.
  • These RNs educate the patient and family about what hospice can provide and prepare all necessary paperwork to facilitate the transfer to hospice care.
  • In this role, the nurse obtains basic information for delivery of care, conducts a physical and environmental assessment and recommends an initial plan of care.
  • These RNs are often the first hospice personnel to interact with the patient and family.
  • Admissions are completed in the patient’s home, hospitals or in nursing facilities within our service area where the patient resides.
  • These positions require a high degree of interpersonal sensitivity and compassion in addition to excellent assessment skills, attention to detail and the ability to work independently.

RN CARE MANAGER, EXTENDED HOURS TEAM

  • The extended hours care manager visits patients in their home or nursing facility.
  • They are responsible for routine and emergent visits scheduled during the evenings, nights and weekends, as well as provide education and support as needed.
  • As an extension of the team RN care manager, this position ensures timely and seamless care to all of our patients.

RN CARE MANAGERS

  • The RN care manager is responsible for the daily care of the patient on an ongoing basis, whether in the patient/family’s home or at another care facility.
  • The RN care manager establishes the comprehensive plan of care in collaboration with other members of the interdisciplinary team, the patient and family.
  • The ability to develop trusting relationships with patients, their families, facility staff and referring physicians is an important skill in this role.
  • This position requires a registered nurse with expert assessment skills, strong technical skills, excellent critical-thinking ability and an ability to work independently.
    • HOME CARE TEAM: Team members must be willing to travel within a designated geographical area while remaining flexible to work in other areas as needs arise. Previous home care experience is preferred.
    • EXTENDED CARE & ASSISTED LIVING TEAM: These care managers provide direct nursing care and coordinate the care of patients with the staff of partnering facilities such as nursing homes, assisted living and extended care facilities.

RN, HOSPICE HOUSE/INPATIENT CARE CENTER

  • Patients come to Hospice House or the inpatient unit for on-site pain and symptom management that is more difficult to accomplish in the field. This is a short-term solution with a return to the home setting once the concern is managed. Typically, patient acuity is higher in these settings.
  • RNs usually have a four- to six-patient load. This is a fast-paced, multi-tasking environment with frequent admissions and discharges.
  • Technical nursing skills used include medication administration (IV), wound care, oxygen administration (BiPAP, CPAP and occasional vent), blood administration and assisting physicians with procedures such as paracentesis.
  • Ohio’s Hospice has several Hospice Houses and inpatient care centers located throughout Ohio.

RN CALL CENTER

  • The Call Center RN takes phone calls from patients or their caregivers and begins the process of assessment and treatment over the phone.
  • They may give the patient/caregiver instructions for symptom management or medical treatment, consult with the hospice physician, and notify the care manager or extended hours nurse of a need for a visit.
  • In this role, the nurse cannot physically see the patient, therefore must have excellent communication skills to get necessary assessment information from the patient or caregiver.
  • For this position, we seek a critical thinker with the ability to prioritize efficiently.
  • Hospice experience is required.

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“Working for Ohio’s Hospice of Butler & Warren Counties is a very rewarding career. There are many areas in which a registered nurse can contribute. You are treated as an equal team member and your input is valued. You are a teacher of the dying process and work on bringing comfort, peace and understanding to the patient and family. I truly enjoy my job and the daily challenges it brings. If you wish to make a difference and touch people’s lives in a meaningful way, I encourage you to consider becoming an Ohio’s Hospice nurse.”

LINDA OSTERDAY | RN, CHPN, HOSPICE HOUSE, OHIO’S HOSPICE OF BUTLER & WARREN COUNTIES

(Video) Jeanne McAleer Ohio's Hospice of Dayton

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F.A.Q.’s


I don’t own a computer; can I fill in a paper application or drop off my resume?

  • All applicant records and documents are stored electronically to facilitate ease and efficiency of sharing information with hiring managers, and to assure nothing is lost; therefore, we do not accept paper documents that are faxed, mailed, or hand-delivered.
  • Most local libraries provide free access to computers.

I’m being asked for an email address and I don’t have one. What should I do?

If you do not have an email address, you can obtain a free email account at Gmail, Yahoo or Hotmail. Please make sure that your email address follows the following format: username@ispname.com


I would like you to have my resume; can I fax, mail or bring one in?

The application profile provides us with more information than a typical resume. It is important that you complete your application profile completely. If you are invited to interview, you will be able to bring a resume at that time.

How can I check the status of my application?

There is a “Returning Candidate” feature on the job sitewhere you can log in with your email address and zip code to check the status of your application.

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Transparency in Coverage

The Transparency in Coverage Rule requires health insurers and group health plans to provide cost-sharing data to consumers via machine-readable files.

To locate and view your machine-readable file information:

  • Click on the URL provided: transparency-in-coverage.uhc.com
  • Hit Ctrl-F on your keyboard to bring up a search bar.
  • Type in your employer name and the associated machine-readable files will appear.
  • Multiple files may appear. Select the ones with your company name and the information and area of interests (network rates, allowed amounts, etc.).
  • Files will be updated monthly in accordance with the Transparency Coverage Rule requirements.

UnitedHealthcare creates and publishes the machine-readable files on behalf of Ohio’s Hospice.

(Video) Ohio’s Hospice of Dayton - Pathway to Excellence®

FAQs

Is working in hospice hard? ›

It can be very hard at times. Our job is remarkable, beautiful, and at times painful, but it is the most rewarding job. It can be hard at times because we are living, caring, individuals who treat our patients like they would treat our loved ones. The hard times occur, but the beautiful moments outweigh the bad.

Is hospice a good career? ›

Hospice nursing is an exceptionally fulfilling career choice. These nurses build deep relationships with patients and walk with their families through some of life's hardest moments. Supporting patients and their loved ones through the patient's final journey can be challenging.

What attracts you to a career in hospice? ›

There are many reasons people are inspired to consider working in hospice. It may be because a person has watched someone they love benefit from hospice care. Others may recognize their natural gift is to help people who need a great deal of compassion, support, and care.

Is being a hospice nurse hard? ›

Being a hospice nurse is exhausting—especially in the inpatient setting. We care for people of all ages. Young people are especially tough on our hearts and minds, and sometimes when families are struggling, it wears on us.

What is it like working in a hospice? ›

“The best part of this job is the time you get to spend with your patients. In other care settings, you're often on your feet running around all the time and you're going from one task to another quick as a flash. In a hospice, you get that tender loving time with patients and you can really get to know them.”

What questions do they ask at a hospice interview? ›

Common Hospice Interview Questions
  • What is your history of experience with hospice care?
  • What would you do if a patient died suddenly under your care?
  • How would you inform a patient's family members of their loved one's death?
  • What role does a hospice nurse play in the overall hospice care team?
Jul 24, 2020

What hospice does not tell you? ›

Hospice providers are very honest and open, but hospice cannot tell you when the patient will die. This is not because they don't want to, it's because they can't always determine it.

What makes a good hospice nurse? ›

They need to be compassionate, sympathetic, patient, and calm under pressure. In addition, they need to be good listeners. Whether they're listening to the family or the patient, they'll hear pain, tragedy, fear, and uncertainty in their voices and it's the nurses job to help them come to terms with the situation.

What do hospice nurses say? ›

Tips from a Hospice Nurse: What to Say to a Dying Person
  • Reminiscence with the person. Talk about memories and accomplishments. ...
  • Listen and be attentive while the dying person is sharing. ...
  • Say I love you. ...
  • Thank the person. ...
  • Offer forgiveness. ...
  • Can you help in another way?

How do I prepare for a hospice volunteer interview? ›

Tell me how you see yourself using your skills and talents in your work with hospice patients? How were you first introduced to Hospice? What do you understand Hospice to be about? How would you describe the commitment of a hospice volunteer?

What qualities do you consider most important in a hospice volunteer? ›

Good Listening skills. An Understanding and Acceptance of Their Own Feelings Regarding Death and Dying. A Strong Comfort Level with People Approaching Death (however, direct experience with death and dying is not required)

Which attribute would be most important for a hospice caregiver to have? ›

Compassion

This attribute is first on the list because many home health clients are in distressing and even painful situations (recovering from surgery, losing their memory to Alzheimer's, etc.). As a result, being caring and empathetic is an absolute must-have in terms of qualities for caregivers.

What are the 3 forms of palliative care? ›

Palliative treatments vary widely and often include:
  • Medication.
  • Nutritional changes.
  • Relaxation techniques.
  • Emotional and spiritual support.
  • Support for children or family caregivers.

What is the biggest barrier to quality palliative and end-of-life care? ›

Commonly reported barriers in the critical care setting include communication gaps (Coelho & Yankaskas, 2017), difficult end-of-life decisions (Wiedemann et al., 2012), and minimal access to education (Wolf et al., 2019).

What are two challenges in providing care for dying people now? ›

These challenges include physical pain, depression, a variety of intense emotions, the loss of dignity, hopelessness, and the seemingly mundane tasks that need to be addressed at the end of life. An understanding of the dying patient's experience should help clinicians improve their care of the terminally ill.

Why do doctors push hospice? ›

There are a number of reasons why hospitals might be motivated to push patients towards hospice care. First, hospice care is typically less expensive than traditional medical care. Second, hospice care is often seen as a way to hasten death.

Why do hospice patients linger? ›

When a person's body is ready and wanting to stop, but the person is still unresolved or unreconciled over some important issue or with some significant relationship, he or she may tend to linger in order to finish whatever needs finishing even though he or she may be uncomfortable or debilitated.

Does hospice care change diapers? ›

The hospice team also teaches the family how to properly care for the patient – such as changing adult diapers, bathing the patient and preparing the right meals according to the patient's recommended diet plan.

What's it like working at a hospice? ›

Many Hospice Staff experience Hospice Care as Family Members

It also enhances the sense of family that exists among the staff. We are there for the patients and families, and we are there for each other. We pull together in times of need, and work as a team, to help everyone we touch to experience this level of care.

Is being a hospice nurse hard? ›

Being a hospice nurse is exhausting—especially in the inpatient setting. We care for people of all ages. Young people are especially tough on our hearts and minds, and sometimes when families are struggling, it wears on us.

Is being a hospice nurse difficult? ›

It allows hospice patients the ability to enjoy what time they have left with their loved ones. Because of the nature of this work, hospice can be one of the most emotionally difficult fields of nursing to work in. Despite those challenges, it is often one of the most rewarding jobs you can do.

What is it like to be in hospice? ›

Typical Days in Hospice Care

A hospice aide will visit several times a week to help with personal care including bathing, grooming, and dressing. Nurses will also visit during the week to assess the patient's medical needs and adjust medications as needed.

What hospice does not tell you? ›

Hospice providers are very honest and open, but hospice cannot tell you when the patient will die. This is not because they don't want to, it's because they can't always determine it.

What skills do hospice nurses need? ›

What Skills Does a Hospice Nurse Need?
  • Communication. Hospice nurses must be skilled communicators who understand how to speak with families about difficult topics. ...
  • Compassion. It can be a very emotional time for families who are preparing for a loved one to pass away. ...
  • Emotional resilience. ...
  • Comfort with death.

What makes a good hospice nurse? ›

They need to be compassionate, sympathetic, patient, and calm under pressure. In addition, they need to be good listeners. Whether they're listening to the family or the patient, they'll hear pain, tragedy, fear, and uncertainty in their voices and it's the nurses job to help them come to terms with the situation.

How many patients should a hospice nurse have? ›

A Crossroads hospice nurse will typically visit 4-6 patients each day, spending about an hour with each patient before driving to the next one.

Are hospice nurses real nurses? ›

Hospice nurses are Registered Nurses that completed either an ADN or BSN and have been trained to work with terminally ill patients. They have many roles, providing comprehensive care for patients who are in their last weeks of life, as well as support for their caregivers and loved ones.

What is a typical day for a hospice nurse? ›

At this time, they take vital signs, do a physical examination and ask questions about how they are feeling, including pain management, how well they sleep and eat, and their toileting habits. During this visit, the hospice nurse determines whether changes need to be made to medication or other aspects of hospice care.

What kind of person is a hospice nurse? ›

Mar 28, 2022 | 1 min read. A hospice nurse is a palliative care nurse responsible for providing end-of-life care to terminally ill patients. Nearly every nurse has encountered a dying patient and had deal with death at least once in their career.

What questions do they ask at a hospice interview? ›

Common Hospice Interview Questions
  • What is your history of experience with hospice care?
  • What would you do if a patient died suddenly under your care?
  • How would you inform a patient's family members of their loved one's death?
  • What role does a hospice nurse play in the overall hospice care team?
Jul 24, 2020

Is hospice nursing flexible? ›

Hospice nurses have flexible schedules, but those schedules can change throughout the day as patient needs change. Hospice nurses have big hearts. They feel strongly that someone should be there for patients and families facing death, and they don't wait to see who else will do the job—they take it on themselves.

What happens in final moments before death? ›

Physical signs

Facial muscles may relax and the jaw can drop. Skin can become very pale. Breathing can alternate between loud rasping breaths and quiet breathing. Towards the end, dying people will often only breathe periodically, with an intake of breath followed by no breath for several seconds.

Why do doctors push hospice? ›

There are a number of reasons why hospitals might be motivated to push patients towards hospice care. First, hospice care is typically less expensive than traditional medical care. Second, hospice care is often seen as a way to hasten death.

How long does the average hospice patient live? ›

How Long Do People Usually Stay in Hospice? Most patients do not enroll in hospice until their time of death draws near. According to a study that was published in the Journal of Palliative Medicine, roughly half of patients who enrolled in hospice died within three weeks, while 35.7 percent died within one week.

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